Fall 2015 Undergraduate Courses

Fall 2015

Topics in Modern Astronomy
This course provides a broad overview of modern astronomy and astrophysics for students in the sciences. Emphasis is on the application of basic physics to understanding of astronomical systems. Topics include the Solar System; planetary systems and exoplanets; the birth, life, and death of stars; white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes; the Milky Way and distant galaxies; cosmology, dark matter and dark energy, and the history of the Universe.
Instructors: Eve Charis Ostriker
The Universe
This specially designed course targets the frontier of modern astrophysics. Subjects include the planets of our solar system, the birth, life, and death of stars; the search for extrasolar planets and extraterrestrial life; the zoo of galaxies from dwarfs to giants, from starbursts to quasars; dark matter and the large-scale structure of the universe; Einstein's special and general theory of relativity, black holes, neutron stars, and big bang cosmology. This course is designed for the non-science major and has no prerequisites past high school algebra and geometry. High school physics would be useful.
Instructors: David N. Spergel, Anatoly Spitkovsky
Planets in the Universe
This is an introductory course in astronomy focusing on planets in our Solar System, and around other stars (exoplanets). First we review the formation, evolution and properties of the Solar system. Following an introduction to stars, we then discuss the exciting new field of exoplanets; discovery methods, earth-like planets, and extraterrestrial life. Core values of the course are quantitative analysis and hands-on experience, including telescopic observations. This STN course is designed for the non-science major and has no prerequisites past high school algebra and geometry. See www.astro.princeton.edu/planets for important changes
Instructors: Gáspár Áron Bakos
General Relativity
Einstein's theory of general relativity and its astrophysical implications, including black holes, cosmological expansion, and gravitational waves.
Instructors: Jeremy J. Goodman